Early Childhood/Kindergarten

​Early Childhood Kimberly Bishop
Early Childhood Lilia Ferguson
Early Childhood/KIDS Teresa Jameson
Early Childhood/KIDS Monique Gonzales
Kindergarten Patricia Hay 
Kindergarten Cherish Geiger
Kindergarten Chelsea Garmon
Kindergarten Kathy Kearney
Kindergarten Jonelle Artis 

Digital Homework

Extra Math Practice...

Add and Subtract

The Common Core Standards state that Kindergarten students should fluently add and subtract within 5. Developing automaticity with addition and subtraction facts begins with subitizing (below). Please make sure that skill is solid first. Then help your child by using the online 5-Frame Tool.

Family Games for Addition and Subtraction

Here is a list of math games that are appropriate for your child to practice at home to become more proficient with math facts to 10. The materials are simple and you may substitute pasta, buttons, or pennies in place of beans.

On and Off
Materials: Beans, 5 x 7 index card
Directions:Child works with a given number of beans. He/she drops them on the index card, records how many landed on, how many landed off, and total.
Example: 2 + 4 = 6

Cave Game
Materials:Beans, cup
Directions:The child works with a given number of beans. He/she places some beans under the cup. He/she then records an equation showing how many are under the cup, how many are not, and the total.
Example: 3 + 2 = 5

String Bean
Materials: String, beans
Directions:The child works with a given number of beans. He/she drops them on the string and records how many landed above, how many landed below, and total.
Example: 3 + 1 = 4

Heads and Tails
Materials:Pennies
Directions:The student works with a given number of pennies. He/she drops them and records how many landed heads up, how many landed tails up, and total.
Example: 2 + 4 = 6

Facts on a Plate
Materials;Beans, paper plate divided in half by drawing a line
Directions:Child works with a given number of beans. He/she drops them on the plate and records an equation showing how many landed on each side and the total.
Example: 2 + 2 = 4

Grab Bag Subtraction
Materials:Paper bag, beans
Directions:Place a given number of beans in a bag. He/she takes some out of the bag. Then records an equation showing how many are left in the bag, how many are out, and the total.
Example: 6 - 4 = 2

Double Compare
Materials:Deck of Cards with kings, queens, and jacks removed (may want to play with only aces through five until child gets more proficient).
Directions:Play with a partner, deal cards out evenly. Both players turn over 2 cards, players add up their two cards and the player with the higher pair gets all the cards. Continue until all cards are played.

Memory 10
Material:Deck of cards with kings, queens, and jacks removed (you may want to play with only 2 suits of cards)
Directions:Lay cards face down in 3 rows and 6 columns. Child turns two cards over and adds to see if they make 10, if not turn back over. When 2 cards are turned over that total 10 the child keeps the cards. Continue until 10’s can no longer be made.

Family Math at Home...

Math Games
Here is a list of math games that are appropriate for your child to practice at home to become more proficient with counting to 20 and beyond. The materials are simple and you may substitute pasta, buttons, Legos, or pennies in place of beans. These are just guidelines, be creative and adjust games to fit your child’s needs.

Tower
Materials: Legos, Dice
Directions:Child rolls the die and then stacks that number of Legos into a tower. To extend the activity, have your child use two dice at one time, or put towers in order from smallest to largest or largest to smallest.

Grab Bag
Materials:Beans, paper bag
Directions:The child takes a handful of beans from the bag. They then count and record how many beans they have. You can then ask them, “How many would one more be? How many would one less be?”

How Many Does It Hold?
Materials: Variety of cups or bowls, beans
Directions:The child works to fill two different containers with beans. They then count how many beans each could hold. They can then discuss which one holds more; which one holds less.

Heads and Tails
Materials:Pennies
Directions:The student works with a given number of pennies. He/she drops them and records how many landed heads up, how many landed tails up.

Collections Patterns
Materials:Collections (beans, buttons, coins, nuts & bolts, paper clips, etc.)
Directions:Child works with a collection item to build a pattern. They arrange their items into a repeating pattern.
Example: nickel, nickel, dime, nickel, nickel, dime, etc.

Rhythmic Patterns
Materials:None
Directions:Have your child create patterns with rhythm. They will clap, slap, stomp & snap out a pattern.
Example: clap, clap, stomp, clap, clap, stomp

Double Compare
Materials:Deck of Cards with kings, queens, and jacks removed (you may want to play with only aces through five until child gets more proficient).
Directions:Play with a partner, deal cards out evenly. Both players turn over 2 cards, players add up their two cards and the player with the higher pair gets all the cards. Continue until all cards are played.

Two Coin Grab Bag
Material:Two types of coins, paper bag
Directions:The child puts two kinds of coins into the bag. They then grab a handful of coins to take out of the bag. They will then sort the coins by type, count how many of each kind and discuss which has more/less.

"How many dots do you see? How do you see them?"

Subitizing means to instantly recognize a quantity without counting. This is one of the most important foundational skills for our students. Download FREE copies of the these dot cards and practice daily until your child has mastered subitizing! Ask your child how they knew the number. This is critical! For example, with the card below, do the students look at the 5 first? Do they count up from 5 (6, 7)? Do they look at the 2 and count up 5? Are they counting all the dots? Or do they know that a group of 5 and a group of 2 make 7? These all indicate very different levels of understanding of numbers. (Source -Donna Boucher)

Helpful Tips for Early Childhood and Kindergarten Parents...

Extra Reading Practice...

High Frequency Words

Being able to read and spell high-frequency words is necessary for fluent reading and writing. Please open the attachment below for a list of kindergarten words. Practice reading and writing the words in meaningful sentences and illustrations. Keep this list handy and have your child refer to it when reading or writing. Please avoid drills with flash cards.

For example...
Display a box of cereal. Write underneath the picture the label "box of cereal" and underline the target word of. Then have your child create his/her own picture card and label, writing the target word in the label in red or some other distinguishing color.
Beginning readers and their parents will delight in PBS KIDS Island, where kids can play free reading games and activities with their parents, teachers, and caregivers. The games make learning to read fun by featuring many of the popular PBS KIDS characters from Sesame Street, Super Why, and others. Parents simply register (for free) on the site, login, and then allow their kids to play the games. Once your child completes one level, they can advance to the next more challenging one by playing a different game. A progress tracker allows parents to see which games their child has completed as well as the skill areas the child has developed.

Handwriting Practice

Typing Practice

Drag and Drop Games

Mouse Practice